Beverley and surrounding areas Groundwater Prohibition Area (GPA)

On 22 November 2022, the EPA wrote to residents and landowners in portions of Beverley, Woodville, Woodville South, Woodville West, Woodville Park, West Croydon, Kilkenny, Findon and Seaton to let them know that it is proceeding with the establishment of a Groundwater Prohibition Area.

This is scheduled to be published in the South Australian Government Gazette on 8 December 2022 and relates to shallow aquifers less than 45 m deep.

The EPA undertook a 90-day community consultation about the proposal and will be establishing the ninth groundwater prohibition area to date.

Copies of past reports, letters and community updates related to EPA assessments undertaken within this area and provided to the community are available from Beverley and Woodville South assessment and Woodville Port Road assessment.

If you are unable to find what you are looking for or if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at:

On 22 November 2022, the EPA wrote to residents and landowners in portions of Beverley, Woodville, Woodville South, Woodville West, Woodville Park, West Croydon, Kilkenny, Findon and Seaton to let them know that it is proceeding with the establishment of a Groundwater Prohibition Area.

This is scheduled to be published in the South Australian Government Gazette on 8 December 2022 and relates to shallow aquifers less than 45 m deep.

The EPA undertook a 90-day community consultation about the proposal and will be establishing the ninth groundwater prohibition area to date.

Copies of past reports, letters and community updates related to EPA assessments undertaken within this area and provided to the community are available from Beverley and Woodville South assessment and Woodville Port Road assessment.

If you are unable to find what you are looking for or if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at:

  • What does this mean if I want to sell my house?

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    Future purchasers of properties within the Beverley Groundwater Prohibition Area will be made aware of the groundwater prohibition via the Form 1 statement provided to prospective buyers at the time of sale.

    This informs future purchasers that existing groundwater bores are no longer able to be used and no future bores can be installed at the property.

    The Form 1 statement is required to be provided by a vendor (usually through the real estate agent or conveyancer) to a prospective buyer under Section 7 of the Land and Business (Sale and Conveyancing) Act 1994.

    Sites that were formerly industrial may have further restrictions that you should be aware of. Please see the Form 1 Statement that was provided to you at the time of purchase of your property, or contact the EPA if you would like more information.

  • Why is bore water being prohibited?

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    Beverley and surrounding suburbs have a commercial, industrial and manufacturing history, with some past chemical disposal and handling practices having contaminated the groundwater.

    If contaminated groundwater is a risk to human health, the EPA has the ability under the Environment Protection Act 1993 to establish a groundwater prohibition area. Both current and future landholders will not be able to access the groundwater.

    Groundwater (bore water) in the upper 3 aquifers (0–45 m below ground level) is known to be contaminated. Deeper aquifers used by schools and councils are not known to be contaminated and are not impacted by the ban.

    Health problems can occur if people come into contact with the contaminated water over a long period of time. The contamination presents a potential risk to human health if groundwater is utilised for drinking, showering, washing, filling swimming pools, watering lawns or irrigating edible produce.

    Preventing the extraction of contaminated groundwater is necessary to protect human health and prevent the spread of contamination. The purpose is to protect both current and future landholders from accessing the contaminated groundwater.

  • Are my fruit and vegies safe?

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    Rain and mains water (tap water) are not affected by groundwater contamination.

    Home-grown fruit and vegetables are safe to consume, provided you are not watering them with bore water.

Page last updated: 23 Nov 2022, 11:52 AM