Edinburgh proposed groundwater prohibition area

Edinburgh airport - photo courtesy Defence Australia

Environmental assessments undertaken by the Commonwealth Department of Defence have determined that groundwater in aquifers 0-60 m below ground level in portions of Edinburgh, Direk, Burton, Salisbury North, Penfield, Paralowie and Waterloo Corner has been contaminated by per- and poly-fluroalkyl substances (PFAS).

These chemicals are a potential health risk if people are accessing it over a long period of time. After completing an assessment of all the information the EPA holds in this area, we are now proposing to establish a groundwater prohibition area in the area shown in this map.

The purpose of a groundwater prohibition area is to protect both current and future landholders from accessing contaminated groundwater via a bore on their property.

Before a determination is made, the EPA will undertake a community consultation which will close on Thursday 16 November 2021. All copies of reports, community updates and information are available on this page. If you cannot find what you’re looking for, or if you have any feedback, questions or concerns, please contact us on:

Ph: 08 8429 7245 or email

Environmental assessments undertaken by the Commonwealth Department of Defence have determined that groundwater in aquifers 0-60 m below ground level in portions of Edinburgh, Direk, Burton, Salisbury North, Penfield, Paralowie and Waterloo Corner has been contaminated by per- and poly-fluroalkyl substances (PFAS).

These chemicals are a potential health risk if people are accessing it over a long period of time. After completing an assessment of all the information the EPA holds in this area, we are now proposing to establish a groundwater prohibition area in the area shown in this map.

The purpose of a groundwater prohibition area is to protect both current and future landholders from accessing contaminated groundwater via a bore on their property.

Before a determination is made, the EPA will undertake a community consultation which will close on Thursday 16 November 2021. All copies of reports, community updates and information are available on this page. If you cannot find what you’re looking for, or if you have any feedback, questions or concerns, please contact us on:

Ph: 08 8429 7245 or email

  • Home grown produce

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    Rainwater and mains water (tap water) are not affected by groundwater contamination. While it is possible for PFAS to accumulate in some plant materials, fruit and vegetables sourced from your backyard are safe to consume, provided you are not watering them with bore water.

  • We value your input!

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    The EPA has established seven groundwater prohibition areas in metropolitan Adelaide.

    Community consultation on the proposed Edinburgh groundwater prohibition area is open until 16 November 2021, and we encourage you to please get in contact with us during this time. We are especially keen to hear from existing bore users, whether your bore is registered or unregistered.

    We are available over the phone and online, and you can reach us during and outside of business hours.

    • Phone: (08) 8429 7245
    • Email
    • On this site: Q&A, 'How you would like to be engaged' poll, and register to stay informed
    • Video conference or in person: please contact us to make arrangements
  • Health impacts

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    Although the understanding of the effects of PFAS in the environment is still emerging, there is limited evidence on the impact of PFAS on human health. As a precaution, SA Health recommends exposure to PFAS to be reduced wherever possible. Please visit the SA Health website for more information.

  • Please do not use your bore water

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    Groundwater (bore water) in the upper 4 Quaternary aquifers is contaminated and should not be used for any purpose. The depth of the known contamination extends from 0–60 m below ground level.

    This prohibition does not extend to Tertiary aquifers deeper than 60 m, such as those used by schools and councils.

    Health problems can occur if people come into contact with the contaminated water over a long period of time. The contamination presents a potential risk to human health if groundwater is utilised for drinking, showering, washing, filling swimming pools, watering lawns or irrigating edible produce.

Page last updated: 21 September 2021, 09:37